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Wednesday, July 12, 2017

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/11/2018 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    When discussing the AK-47, the author states that in the movie Rambo, the title character wreaks havoc on a town using an AK-47. Uh... no he doesn't. He is actually using an M-60 machine gun that he got out of the back of the deuce and a half truck he stole from a hapless Washington State National Guardsman. Small point, but your comment is inaccurate, nonetheless.
  2. 1 point
    Thanks Ron, Yes I have many books, including The Devil's Brigade, and read tons online...really interesting unit and history, one tough bunch of guys!
  3. 1 point
    In trials of the Owen, the operator went to the end of a mud-bog,thrust the gun deeply into the mud and held it there.Then he pulled it out,turned it over and submerged it again, ensuring that mud was pushed into all surfaces. The gun was then retrieved and, without cleaning or adjustment ,proceeded to fire perfectly. THe now empty magazine was then replaced and the weapon continued firing. "Almost unbelievable ,isn't it ?" said the newreel commentator. Because it was an Australian weapon,of course, few outsders have every heard of it. The Owen Machine-Carbine continued in use by the Australian army in Korea and the early years of the Vietnam conflict. (vide Arms of Destruction: Ranking the World's Best Land Weapons of WW2. Robert A Slayton, among other sources)
  4. 1 point
    Regardless of what name it goes by "shell shock or any other name" the best therapy is talking about it with those that know what you are talking about. The educated headshrinkers think they know but they don't
  5. 1 point
    What we now call PTSD has probably been around since the beginning of organized warfare. In American terms, during the Civil War it was called Soldier's Heart or Nostalgia. World War one it became Shell Shock, World War Two called it Combat Fatigue. For my generation at first it was called Post Vietnam Syndrome and then PTSD. As it was explained to me during my treatment, PTSD is a normal reaction to abnormal circumstances. Once I quit drinking, and I never took the drugs the VA offered, my head gradually cleared with the passage of time. Today I prefer to only associate with fellow veterans, as a member of AmVets, VFW, American Legion, and Vietnam Veterans of America. I do not have any "civilian" friends. By the way, the new "politically correct" designation is PTS. They no longer want to say we are disordered. As if we are flippin' snowflakes that might suffer damage at a word.
  6. 1 point
    Heavily slanted towards the anti war crowd views from the 60's, Yet to meet a 11 B that wear the CIB that didn't feel the same way ☺
  7. 1 point
    My vote goes to the Sten. It changed the way armies looked at firearms - they were no longer like watches, to be looked after and repaired. If a Sten stops working, you throw it away, and indent for a new one. As disposable as a plastic razor. With the massive losses of equipment at Dunkirk, the UK needed replacements FAST, and the Sten came out of the trap like a champion greyhound - from idea to working prototype in just weeks. It was heavily influenced by the iconic Mp40 (Misnamed by many after Hugo Schmiesser) but WITHOUT the MP40's "unique selling point" - the mainspring of an MP40 is packaged up as a telescopic tube; when you disassemble the gun under field conditions, what falls out looks not like a spring, but more like a bicycle pump. Helps keep out the crud. Advanced Primer Ignition was not a new idea with the Sten, but is a clever idea to have incorporated. When you pull the trigger, and the sten's bolt moves forward, picking up a round along the way, it fires that round BEFORE the bolt has fully closed. The "bang" comes when the bolt is still moving forward - and that "bang" includes recoil, starting to push the bolt BACK before it fully closes. This impacts on the rate of fire: forces it down to a controllable level. It was retained in the Sterling (sucessor to the Sten, and the hardware I was encouraged to lug around with me rather a few years later.) In 1940, the Sten filled a dangerous gap in the country's armament, but didn't just "do the job"; it did it well enough to remain in production (as the Sterling) and be exported worldwide for several decades. It was produced with a built-in Maxim silencer - which worked very well - it was air dropped in huge numbers to resistance fighters all over the world. Many of the Stens dropped on Warsaw fell into German hands, and at the end of the war were pressed into German service (as were straight copies, made in Germany called the "Potsdam aparatus".) Stens were produced in sheds and garages all over occupied Europe by the resistance - it's just THAT simple a design. When the ENEMY is copying your gear... you know it's good.
  8. 1 point
    Department of Homeland Security?? Interesting since they do not own or operate Davis Monthan. Why would they be involved in the future of an Air Force base or of the aircraft stored there?


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