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Wednesday, July 12, 2017

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  1. 1 point
    I don't know about "very few" knowing the history, but the Guardsman described in the picture mounting guard outside Buckingham Palace is a member of the Grenadier Guards- not the Coldstream as described. Apart from the regimental badges their loyalty can be ascertained by examining the buttons in the front of the tunic. They are arranged in ones for the Grenadiers. In groups of two for the Coldstream. Groups of three for the Scots Guards. Groupds of four for the Irish Guards, and groups of five for the Welsh Guards.
  2. 1 point
    A couple of comments here, particularly on the following passage: "By now the Germans had advanced nearly 200 miles into the Soviet Union’s territory and they were just a third of the way to Moscow...This strategic operation was launched by the Wehrmacht and commanded by Field Marshal Fedor von Bock, who was the head of Army Group Centre. The plan was to attack from Poland through the Bialystok-Minsk-Smolensk axis towards Moscow." Jurgen keeps referring to Barbarossa as the operation launched "from Poland" into the Soviet Union's territory, when in fact - particularly as it relates to Army Group Center - it was launched from West Poland into East Poland occupied by RKKA. For example, Bialystok only became 'the Soviet Union's territory' just over 2 years prior to that. "The casualities were tremendous for the Soviets: 417,729 men. The equipment the Red Army lost was also great, comprising 1,177-1,669 aircraft, 4,799 tanks, and 9,427 guns and mortars. The Germans, on the other hand, lost a comparably small number of 12,157 men, considering that the initial attack started with a total number of 750,000 men. The battle was ferocious for the Soviets and caused them a defeat which made the world think they lost the war." The description of this battle as "ferocious for the Soviets" will probably change if you add another statistics - namely that the number of Soviet POWs and deserters was in the millions. Hardly a ferocious fighting force, all things considered. I would describe it as a pretty damning evidence of the total command and control collapse.
  3. 1 point
    SITES AROUND THE AUSCHWITZ BIRKENAU My new material from the Poland-2018 trip took me almost a month of researching, writing, editing. I have visited the Auschwitz memorial site and want to share with you ‘beyond-the-fence’ walking experience along the locations of the historical significance, generally poor known among the visitors. With great respect, I hope this article can widen your understanding of the place, motivate for mindful history and to make your own travel. I would be greatly appreciated for your feedback (comments, questions, suggestions) as it energizes me to work and share new materials with you. Travel your own history. https://war-documentary.info/beyond-birkenau/
  4. 1 point
    Failure to take Britain out of the war had incredible strategic implications for the Germans. A country with an empire, a massive navy and plenty of space to build bomber bases remained in the position to threaten their gains in the west. With England (Britain) out of the war you can assume that the USA would not get involved, and if they would where would their staging area be? New York Harbor is a long way from Europe and Bombers couldn't fly that far. Not having a bomber threat meant that Germans could use the men (and woman) working the FLAK guns for something else. It also meant that the Germans now had to start building the Atlantic Wall to defend their vulnerable coastline. The time, money and materials invested in it could then have been used elsewhere. Invading Russia without taking out Britain was the turning point for me.


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