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Wednesday, July 12, 2017

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  1. 1 point
    A sergeant. The division patch is that of the 36th Division, a Texas-Oklahoma National Guard unit formed in late July - early August 1917 at Camp Bowie near Fort Worth. The insignia is an arrowhead pointed down with the letter T superimposed. The arrowhead represents Oklahoma and the T is for Texas. His collar brass (the round device with US on it) also shows the number 3. This is the 3rd Texas Infantry Regiment which was later renumbered as the 143rd US Infantry. This helps us identify the time frame of the photo since that change occurred in October 1917 when the 3rd and 5th Texas Infantry Regiments were combined to form the 143rd US. The distinctive unit insignia behind the collar brass is, probably, since I don’t have one handy, the insignia of the 3rd Texas Infantry although it could be an early insignia for the 143rd. It is certainly not the current insignia 143rd Infantry which was approved in 1926. The wreathed shield, barred, with a star surmounting is typical of Texas units of the time and even survives in the modern insignia of the 144th US Infantry which was formed in the 36th Division at the same time as the 143rd. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/143rd_Infantry_Regiment_(United_States) for the current 143rd insignia and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/144th_Infantry_Regiment_(United_States) to compare with the insignia of the 144th. The qualification badges are, on the left “Expert” and on the right appears to be “Marksman” although the glare in the photo could be covering the detail that would make it a “Sharpshooter” badge; the difference being the marksman badge has a plain center to the cross, but the sharpshooter badge has a superimposed circular target. My bet, just because of the glare, is that it a Marksman qualification badge. The rectangles below the badges would identify the weapon for which he earned the qualification badges, but the photo does not have enough detail for further identification. So, photo was probably taken sometime between the end of July and mid-October 1917.
  2. 1 point
    my pleasure sir.and thank you.
  3. 1 point
    My name is Phil elsner and I enlisted in the United States navy in July 1964.in August I was sent to the great lakes naval training center and after three months I was sent to my first duty station.this was in Washington d,c.and it was in anacostia naval air station. I was there for one year and after leaving I was sent to the uss Yorktown CVS 10 in long beach California. In 1965 we left for Vietnam and the Tonkin gulf.we did two tours of cutoff the coast and going north to Yankee station.we were out in the area for six months and then we were relieved by another carrier and we returned back to the states.after three years I was honorably discharged. Thank you Phil elsner photo mate third class ret.
  4. 1 point
    good morning ,my name is phil elsner and i am a retired photo mate third class and i served two years aboard the uss yorktown cvs 10,my mos was working in ops division and i worked in the ships photo lab,during the vietnam war i did two tours of duty in the gulf of tonkin.thank you .phil elsner.
  5. 1 point
    I've always wanted to find out what others thought about, If the Beach Assignments were set up differently... Mainly, the Americans Land on Sword and Juno, Canadians at Gold, and the British Forces at Omaha and Utah Beach. Taking in consideration the Different Equipment, Tactics and Leadership of the Units that went in on that day. Also, Gen Patton's Third Army going in thru Caen. Could the collapse of the German Forces have happened quicker?
  6. 1 point
    Yeah, I imagine a snow covered trench with a mortar crew in it, and a guy telling his senior, "Comrade Junior Lieutenant, since we're not firing the mortar for another couple of hours, let me grab that sniper rifle and crawl off to shoot some Germans from the distance." And, by the way, where would he even get the sniper rifle? What a crock...
  7. 1 point
    Jay Hemmings writes, "His unit was sent into battle in the Battle of Moscow in 1941, but he quickly decided that he needed to do more to the German soldiers than simply fire mortars at them. He started to use his unit’s time off to hunt down German troops in the city and take them out from a distance." I don't know your source, Jay, but I do know that Wehrmacht never entered Moscow, so the only German troops "in the city" were POWs, and it would make no sense to "hunt them down and take them out from the distance". The part about "he quickly decides" to do anything other than what he was assigned to do as a rank and file soldier in RKKA is very much doubtful as well - this is not how things worked in that organization.
  8. 1 point
    Here are the Top 5 Russian special task forces that made the word “Spetsnaz” famous and recognizable around the globe. 1. GRU Spetsnaz: Born in 1950, special units of the Main Intelligence Directorate (GRU) are the “eyes and ears” of the Russian Army’s General Staff. Not coincidentally, their emblem depicts a bat against a backdrop of a globe, not unlike that of a certain caped crusader. Like this animal, GRU Spetsnaz covertly and quietly operates in the dead of night around the whole world. The night before Warsaw Pact forces entered Prague on 21 August 1968 and ended the Prague Spring, Spetsnaz GRU fighters effortlessly took control of all the main administrative buildings of the Czech capital. Spetsnaz GRU undertook missions in Angola, Beirut, Vietnam, Afghanistan and Cambodia, where they even managed to steal a brand-new AH-1 Cobra helicopter from anAmerican base. 2. FSB Spetsnaz: When at the 1972 Munich Olympics Palestinian terrorists attacked and killed members of the Israeli team, the Soviet leadership was determined never to let anything of the sort happen in the Soviet Union. Two years later, the Alpha Group counter-terrorism task force of the KGB was established. Moscow was preparing to host the 1980 Summer Olympics, and Alpha was charged with guaranteeing security. Alpha Group’s most famous operations include the assault (along with Spetsnaz GRU) of the Tajbeg Palace in Afghanistan and the assassination of Afghan President Hafizullah Amin in 1979. During the Chechen Wars, the task group attempted to liberate a hospital in Budyonnovsk, seized by the terrorists. However, the assault was thwarted, and the militants managed to escape. In 2002 FSB’s Alpha and its comrade Vympel (established in 1981) assaulted the Dubrovka Theater in Moscow after it was seized by terrorists. As a result of the operation, 750 hostages were liberated, while 36 militants were killed. Unfortunately, 130 hostages died during the assault and afterwards in the hospital. 3. Airborne Troops special forces: Unlike their colleagues from Spetsnaz GRU, airborne special forces do not operate worldwide. Their main task is to prepare a foothold in the enemy rear for the mass landing of the Airborne Troops and they usually operate at a distance of no more than 2,000 km from their forces. The Airborne Troops special task force today is the 45th Guards Independent Reconnaissance Brigade (until 2015, regiment). During the First Chechen War, the regiment’s soldiers participated in the assault of Grozny. Chechen militants were shocked by the Spetsnaz forces’ “silent” method of work: they quietly occupied building after building, leaving them for the motorized infantry that followed. Whole Chechen units disappeared without a trace. 4. Navy Spetsnaz: The first Soviet frogmen appeared during the siege of Leningrad in 1941 to protect the city and the Baltic Fleet. There, they clashed with torpedo boats from the Italian 12th Assault Vessel Squadron, which targeted the Soviet warships, as well as the city's bridges, communications posts, and infrastructure. As a result, Soviet specialists prevented Leningrad from being blown up. Nowadays, units of the Russian Underwater Diversionary Forces and Facilities (PDSS), as the Navy Spetsnaz is called, are based with each Russian Fleet and fill their ranks with the best-of-the-best Marines. The mission of such units is to ensure the security of naval facilities and warships. In the event of war, the PDSS undertakes saboteur missions in enemy waters. 5. Special Operations Forces: The youngest among the Russian Spetsnaz units, the Special Operations Forces (SOF) were established in 2009. This structure is subordinate to the General Staff and includes and deploys all types of Army special task forces. Information on SOF personnel and operations is classified. It is known that its fighters took part in operations in Crimea (2014), Syria and clashes with Somali pirates.
  9. 1 point
    You have to put it into some context. The German and other Axis POWs were not exclusively being herded into the camps - literally millions of former Soviet citizens had been fighting against RKKA and rounded up at the end of the war. I haven't seen any accounts about the Germans particularly being targeted for mass extermination, but they were definitely used as slave labor all over the devastated by the war country. Also, Stalin exiled many ethnic Germans to Kazakhstan during the war. 1989 census reported close to a million of them residing there.
  10. 1 point
    The German U-Boat. The Deadliest Hunter Of The Sea -The Destroyer of Souls - Jay Hemmings for example, I started reading it and was stopped in my tracks by the assertion "and they were the first nation to use subs during that particular war". Rubbish. Britain was equipped with operational Submarines at the start of the war. Then I got to "In 1939, when the Second World War broke out, Germany had only managed to construct 57 U-boats, but these new U-boats were far sturdier and more technologically advanced than their WWI predecessors, featuring heat-seeking torpedoes, large gun decks, and spiderweb mines". I stopped reading at that point. There is just no room for these sorts of errors in a historical narrative and I'm afraid errors and ommissions of this magnitude make a nonsense of the whole article. To be fair to Mr. Hemmings, he is not the only one authoring articles with significant errors of fact in them and it detracts from the whole site when they are allowed to get past publishers.
  11. 1 point
    First off, let me apologize to all for what clearly appears to be a "rant" in my initial comment. But it is frustrating to see this error repeatedly in the articles on this site. But to answer Philip, the differences between right and left are seen as: the left-wing believes society is best served with an expanded, controlling role for the government, which use social systems and ideologies of force (e.g., socialism, fascism, communism, “progressivism”). The right believes that individual rights and civil liberties are paramount and the role — and especially the power — of the government is minimized, seen in social systems and ideologies of freedom (e.g., capitalism, classical liberalism, constitutional republicanism), and based on fundamental moral truths on which freedom depends. The left believes it is not only ok, but imperative that they take what is yours and spread it to those who did not work for it. The right believes it is their inherent right to keep what they have worked for. Example: we may ask, what about those less fortunate? The left believes in coercion (higher taxes, wealth distribution, etc) to address this problem. The right prefers to use charity and choice (charitable organizations, churches, etc) to address the problem, which by the way has been seen to provide much higher success than force. A current lesson in the news is the destruction of Venezuela by the imposition of socialism as its system of government. Socialism has NEVER worked in any country where it has ever been tried. As long as imperfect humans are running it, it can never work. Sorry for the possibly long-winded answer, but there is, in fact, much more that could be added about these political systems. And one caveat I must state, that even though capitalism is included in much of the discussion about this topic, it is actually a financial system, not a political system. The USA is a federal (constitutional) republic politically and uses capitalism as its financial system.
  12. 1 point
    I kind of agree with Joe, the criterion for distinguishing the 'left' from the 'right' seems to be as arbitrary as Hegel's dialectics. In fact, late Stanford University research fellow Antony Sutton said as much calling 'left-right' division a Hegelian trap. It stroke me as insightful enough to pose when I realized that Hitler's Nazi Germany and Stalin's USSR started the Second World War together - as de facto and de jure allies - by agreeing to and executing the division of Poland, a sovereign European state, in near perfect accord.
  13. 1 point
    Thanks for the comment. Yes it probably somewhat sweeping but hardly an accusation. A comment on the "document" before me, yes. A statement on the commentators style and research, yes. Obviously, I follow the site but I tend to have a researchers outlook (engineering law), which fortunately my kids and grand kids follow, so the first answer to a issue/event/design or problem may not be the correct one and/or even free of extraneous thought which is why cross referencing is always recommended. Without going into a blow by blow pull down of the article a simple thought would be well kept in mind - there is a difference in planning and capability. They may have "planned" to use 12 nukes but did they have the capability? Or did the fire bombing of Tokyo in April really show the way for without the massive cash requirement of the nukes? It was certainly way more effective than the nukes in terms of bodies and buildings. Without wishing to be a smart-arse, the following is an interesting look at some of the extent of the "cost" of the nukes development:- https://www.citylab.com/design/2018/05/inside-the-secret-cities-that-created-the-atomic-bomb/559601/ Remember the site is semi-historical and some of the articles/comments are in fact quite enlightening.
  14. 1 point
    HITLER IN VIENNA 1906-1913 SITES My 2017 visit to Vienna and Austria included a number of historical sites and I want to share a detailed review of the sites, connected with Adolf Hitler and his so-called 1906-1913 ‘’Viennese period”. I have used a number of books about Vienna, biographies of Hitler, including Ian Kershaw’s and Briggite Hamann’s masterpieces to cover the exhaustedly detailed 6000-word article on Hitler early years and the story of these particular city sites. As always, you can count on me to find plenty of photos and Google maps with all markings. Hope, you will enjoy the material and inspire yourself to travel, read books and to give me feedback. Please leave comments, ask questions, suggest alterations, share with friends and those interested. https://war-documentary.info/adolf-hitler-in-vienna-1906-1913/
  15. 1 point
    I can't read any article on FB of yours anymore without a scam pop up trying to direct me to what I've "won". I'll give it a little longer and if it continues I figure your complicit and give up on your site.
  16. 1 point
    Never stop reading and never get your history from the TV, movies, or UTube.
  17. 1 point
    I am new to this site. RE: Even in The USA, There Are Still Many Things Folks Don’t Know Too Much About The American Civil War, seems to be a topic. But I can't find the other replies. Yes, the average US citizen does not have a clue about the War Between the States. Most think it was over slavery. It was over money. The South had money, the North wanted it. Lincoln started the crap about freeing slaves as a tool to get 100,000 men into the Union Army. His so-called, "emancipation proclamation" only freed slaves in the Confederacy. At that time, it was legal for States to leave the Union. The South left the Union and formed an independent nation. Lincoln had no authority in the South. What it did do, was make an impact in the North. Blacks joined the Union Army by the droves. If Lincoln had not done this, his army would have dried up. Also, if the war was to free slaves, why did the Union Generals own slaves? I like the question; Who owned more slaves during the war; General Lee or Grant? The answer, of course, is General Grant, a future president. General Lee freed the slaves he had. This is just the start of the discussion. There are so many other topics on the War Between the States that we could make a website just for that.
  18. 1 point
    It's a show about a detective during WW2 who solves crimes that people commit on the homefront. Very realistic, no CGI or anything like that. It pays attention to history. You have to watch it closely though to pay attention to detail, so you can get the mystery. My family and I are going to visit England this August, and I plan to visit Hastings and Dover there, maybe take the chunnel over to Dunkirk. Lots of history.
  19. 1 point
    Two U.S. Air Force A-10C Thunderbolt IIs, a P-38 Lightning and a P-47 Thunderbolt fly in formation during the 2017 Heritage Flight Training.
  20. 1 point
    My late uncle John Russell was the TV Lawman. He also co starred in It Takes a Thief as Dover for Robert Wagner Al Mundy charcters Boss. His last movie was 1985 Pale Rider. Was Marine Intelligence officer on Guadalcanal, had malaria. Never told any war accounts when I was younger, Dont know his Unit, etc nothing. Any Marine vet can Help. IE acess Personnel files, Unit files etc for Guadalcanal, 1942. & Lawman is on DVD from Amazon as is It Takes a Thief.
  21. 1 point
    None of the above. While the P-51 gets deserved attention, it lacked credible firepower at first, (along with a lackluster power plant) and never really achieved the long range capabilities that was needed over Germany. That's why you don't see any of the top aces flying the Mustang, they just couldn't get to the fight, and if they did, they had to drop their tanks, fire off as many rounds as fast as they could, and run for home before they ran out of gas. The ME-109 was an out-dated design right from the start of the war, and only pulled in the big numbers against the poor Russians. Speaking of which, the YAK was a flying gas bomb. It could be argued that it was more beneficial to the Germans, than it was to the poorly trained Russian pilots who had to fly it. The Spitfire? While it was pretty, and it was arguably dearly loved by almost everyone who flew it, it was also a very delicate, temperamental aircraft, and more like a ballerina attempting to play ice hockey than a true fighter. The Mosquito? One word, wood. Anyone with a peashooter could blow holes in that thing big enough to shove a sheep through. (And often did, that's why it didn't really make any kind of impact at all during the war, until the Brits fitted it with radar, and started flying it under the cover of darkness.) I won't go through all of them, but I'll get straight to the point, Lockheed Lightning P-38. It never did well in Europe, (never did get it sorted out before the P-51 showed up, and despite it's drawbacks, the Mustang did better over Europe than the Lightning did.) But in the Pacific, the top two American aces of the war both flew the "Forked Tail Devil".
  22. 1 point


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