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Wednesday, July 12, 2017

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  1. 1 point
    I've always wanted to find out what others thought about, If the Beach Assignments were set up differently... Mainly, the Americans Land on Sword and Juno, Canadians at Gold, and the British Forces at Omaha and Utah Beach. Taking in consideration the Different Equipment, Tactics and Leadership of the Units that went in on that day. Also, Gen Patton's Third Army going in thru Caen. Could the collapse of the German Forces have happened quicker?
  2. 1 point
    Jay Hemmings writes, "His unit was sent into battle in the Battle of Moscow in 1941, but he quickly decided that he needed to do more to the German soldiers than simply fire mortars at them. He started to use his unit’s time off to hunt down German troops in the city and take them out from a distance." I don't know your source, Jay, but I do know that Wehrmacht never entered Moscow, so the only German troops "in the city" were POWs, and it would make no sense to "hunt them down and take them out from the distance". The part about "he quickly decides" to do anything other than what he was assigned to do as a rank and file soldier in RKKA is very much doubtful as well - this is not how things worked in that organization.
  3. 1 point
    Yeah, I imagine a snow covered trench with a mortar crew in it, and a guy telling his senior, "Comrade Junior Lieutenant, since we're not firing the mortar for another couple of hours, let me grab that sniper rifle and crawl off to shoot some Germans from the distance." And, by the way, where would he even get the sniper rifle? What a crock...
  4. 1 point
    Here are the Top 5 Russian special task forces that made the word “Spetsnaz” famous and recognizable around the globe. 1. GRU Spetsnaz: Born in 1950, special units of the Main Intelligence Directorate (GRU) are the “eyes and ears” of the Russian Army’s General Staff. Not coincidentally, their emblem depicts a bat against a backdrop of a globe, not unlike that of a certain caped crusader. Like this animal, GRU Spetsnaz covertly and quietly operates in the dead of night around the whole world. The night before Warsaw Pact forces entered Prague on 21 August 1968 and ended the Prague Spring, Spetsnaz GRU fighters effortlessly took control of all the main administrative buildings of the Czech capital. Spetsnaz GRU undertook missions in Angola, Beirut, Vietnam, Afghanistan and Cambodia, where they even managed to steal a brand-new AH-1 Cobra helicopter from anAmerican base. 2. FSB Spetsnaz: When at the 1972 Munich Olympics Palestinian terrorists attacked and killed members of the Israeli team, the Soviet leadership was determined never to let anything of the sort happen in the Soviet Union. Two years later, the Alpha Group counter-terrorism task force of the KGB was established. Moscow was preparing to host the 1980 Summer Olympics, and Alpha was charged with guaranteeing security. Alpha Group’s most famous operations include the assault (along with Spetsnaz GRU) of the Tajbeg Palace in Afghanistan and the assassination of Afghan President Hafizullah Amin in 1979. During the Chechen Wars, the task group attempted to liberate a hospital in Budyonnovsk, seized by the terrorists. However, the assault was thwarted, and the militants managed to escape. In 2002 FSB’s Alpha and its comrade Vympel (established in 1981) assaulted the Dubrovka Theater in Moscow after it was seized by terrorists. As a result of the operation, 750 hostages were liberated, while 36 militants were killed. Unfortunately, 130 hostages died during the assault and afterwards in the hospital. 3. Airborne Troops special forces: Unlike their colleagues from Spetsnaz GRU, airborne special forces do not operate worldwide. Their main task is to prepare a foothold in the enemy rear for the mass landing of the Airborne Troops and they usually operate at a distance of no more than 2,000 km from their forces. The Airborne Troops special task force today is the 45th Guards Independent Reconnaissance Brigade (until 2015, regiment). During the First Chechen War, the regiment’s soldiers participated in the assault of Grozny. Chechen militants were shocked by the Spetsnaz forces’ “silent” method of work: they quietly occupied building after building, leaving them for the motorized infantry that followed. Whole Chechen units disappeared without a trace. 4. Navy Spetsnaz: The first Soviet frogmen appeared during the siege of Leningrad in 1941 to protect the city and the Baltic Fleet. There, they clashed with torpedo boats from the Italian 12th Assault Vessel Squadron, which targeted the Soviet warships, as well as the city's bridges, communications posts, and infrastructure. As a result, Soviet specialists prevented Leningrad from being blown up. Nowadays, units of the Russian Underwater Diversionary Forces and Facilities (PDSS), as the Navy Spetsnaz is called, are based with each Russian Fleet and fill their ranks with the best-of-the-best Marines. The mission of such units is to ensure the security of naval facilities and warships. In the event of war, the PDSS undertakes saboteur missions in enemy waters. 5. Special Operations Forces: The youngest among the Russian Spetsnaz units, the Special Operations Forces (SOF) were established in 2009. This structure is subordinate to the General Staff and includes and deploys all types of Army special task forces. Information on SOF personnel and operations is classified. It is known that its fighters took part in operations in Crimea (2014), Syria and clashes with Somali pirates.
  5. 1 point
    You have to put it into some context. The German and other Axis POWs were not exclusively being herded into the camps - literally millions of former Soviet citizens had been fighting against RKKA and rounded up at the end of the war. I haven't seen any accounts about the Germans particularly being targeted for mass extermination, but they were definitely used as slave labor all over the devastated by the war country. Also, Stalin exiled many ethnic Germans to Kazakhstan during the war. 1989 census reported close to a million of them residing there.
  6. 1 point
    I can't read any article on FB of yours anymore without a scam pop up trying to direct me to what I've "won". I'll give it a little longer and if it continues I figure your complicit and give up on your site.
  7. 1 point
    It's a show about a detective during WW2 who solves crimes that people commit on the homefront. Very realistic, no CGI or anything like that. It pays attention to history. You have to watch it closely though to pay attention to detail, so you can get the mystery. My family and I are going to visit England this August, and I plan to visit Hastings and Dover there, maybe take the chunnel over to Dunkirk. Lots of history.
  8. 1 point
    None of the above. While the P-51 gets deserved attention, it lacked credible firepower at first, (along with a lackluster power plant) and never really achieved the long range capabilities that was needed over Germany. That's why you don't see any of the top aces flying the Mustang, they just couldn't get to the fight, and if they did, they had to drop their tanks, fire off as many rounds as fast as they could, and run for home before they ran out of gas. The ME-109 was an out-dated design right from the start of the war, and only pulled in the big numbers against the poor Russians. Speaking of which, the YAK was a flying gas bomb. It could be argued that it was more beneficial to the Germans, than it was to the poorly trained Russian pilots who had to fly it. The Spitfire? While it was pretty, and it was arguably dearly loved by almost everyone who flew it, it was also a very delicate, temperamental aircraft, and more like a ballerina attempting to play ice hockey than a true fighter. The Mosquito? One word, wood. Anyone with a peashooter could blow holes in that thing big enough to shove a sheep through. (And often did, that's why it didn't really make any kind of impact at all during the war, until the Brits fitted it with radar, and started flying it under the cover of darkness.) I won't go through all of them, but I'll get straight to the point, Lockheed Lightning P-38. It never did well in Europe, (never did get it sorted out before the P-51 showed up, and despite it's drawbacks, the Mustang did better over Europe than the Lightning did.) But in the Pacific, the top two American aces of the war both flew the "Forked Tail Devil".
  9. 1 point


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