Jump to content
Wednesday, July 12, 2017
Joris

What was the best submachine gun of WWII?

What was the best submachine gun of WWII?  

149 members have voted

  1. 1. What was the best submachine gun of WWII?

    • MP40
      65
    • Thompson Submachine Gun
      40
    • Sten gun
      10
    • PPSh-41
      35


Recommended Posts

Your votes, please!

Which submachine gun will be the winner?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the MP40 is a long lasting weapon, used until 2011 in the Libyan Civil war, and in Syria as well.  it did have a feed problem that was corrected with better training and with proper training could be fired single shot, which was great considering it was a fully automatic weapon.  accuracy was about the same as the Thompson and the ammo count was the same in the stick magazine.  It was a toss up, but I went with the MP40 due to longevity.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Thompson was very expensive to produce, hence the M1 and the M1A1 versions that were introduced during the war, but even those were replaced by the M3 Grease gun.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The  PPSh 41 was a confidence weapon in every enviroment but I think it´s underpowered. The 7,62 x 25 isn´t a good military round. The 9 Para is a better cartridge for this kind of weapons. My vote is MP40

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is one thing to think about with the MP40 it was the gun every resistance group wanted to get their hands on in WW2 in occupied Europe from the Warsaw Ghetto to France.  It had ROF accurate easy to make cheap and could be copied pretty easy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All good weapons that are effective.I would vote for the Grease Gun but it was not included.The PPSh-41 got my vote as a balance between firepower and weight.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I think that in this poll 2 important SMG are missing. 

The italian Beretta MAB38 and the finnish Suomi KP31. 

The first one was defined by many authors the best SMG of the war, was produced in italy and used only starting from 1941 in limited quantities. When the production became enough big to equip an acceptable number of solider, was alredy 1943, so most of those were used by the RSI. Even the German Army really pareciate the weapon, using a large number of those and considering it a little bit heavy but sightly more accurate and reliable, due the high quality manufacturing and producing progress.

The Suomi KP31, was the main SMG of the finnish army, and was produced since the early 30's, really well designed, the soviets noticecd immediatly the advantages of this amazing SMG that was used to inspire the great PPSH. In general, the Suomi KP-31 was a highly effective,reliable and accurate gun, but too expensive to manufacture.

breda30 mab38.jpg

dlr8Yko.jpg

Edited by 𝕱𝖆𝖚𝖘𝖙𝕻𝖆𝖙𝖗𝖔𝖓𝖊42
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

   I always liked the U.S. M3-A1.  I guess the Carl Gustav M/45 was developed too late for consideration.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/3/2017 at 9:59 AM, Joris said:

The Thompson was very expensive to produce, hence the M1 and the M1A1 versions that were introduced during the war, but even those were replaced by the M3 Grease gun.

 

 

Given that, at the heart of the Thompson design was the so called "Blish piece" which delayed blowback (through a reluctance of phosphor bronze to slide on steel) The discovery that the expensive bronze part wasn't necessary - and was totally left out of mass-produced war time weapons means... we're actually talking here about TWO, fundamentally different, weapons. One featuring "delayed blowback", the other "direct blowback". There are plenty of difference between the various models of Sten, with the Mk3 at its crudest, and the Mk 7 at its most ornate. But at least all Sten Guns operated the same way: "direct blowback, with advanced primer ignition." (Or as the army insists on calling it "Gas and spring".)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My vote goes to the Sten. It changed the way armies looked at firearms - they were no longer like watches, to be looked after and repaired. If a Sten stops working, you throw it away, and indent for a new one. As disposable as a plastic razor. With the massive losses of equipment at Dunkirk, the UK needed replacements FAST, and the Sten came out of the trap like a champion greyhound - from idea to working prototype in just weeks. It was heavily influenced by the iconic Mp40 (Misnamed by many after Hugo Schmiesser) but WITHOUT the MP40's "unique selling point" - the mainspring of an MP40 is packaged up as a telescopic tube; when you disassemble the gun under field conditions, what falls out looks not like a spring, but more like a bicycle pump. Helps keep out the crud. Advanced Primer Ignition was not a new idea with the Sten, but is a clever idea to have incorporated. When you pull the trigger, and the sten's bolt moves forward, picking up a round along the way, it fires that round BEFORE the bolt has fully closed.  The "bang" comes when the bolt is still moving forward - and that "bang" includes recoil, starting to push the bolt BACK before it fully closes. This impacts on the rate of fire: forces it down to a controllable level. It was retained in the Sterling (sucessor to the Sten, and the hardware I was encouraged to lug around with me rather a few years later.) In 1940, the Sten filled a dangerous gap in the country's armament, but didn't just "do the job"; it did it well enough to remain in production (as the Sterling) and be exported worldwide for several decades. It was produced with a built-in Maxim silencer - which worked very well - it was air dropped in huge numbers to resistance fighters all over the world. Many of the Stens dropped on Warsaw fell into German hands, and at the end of the war were pressed into German service (as were straight copies, made in Germany called the "Potsdam aparatus".) Stens were produced in sheds and garages all over occupied Europe by the resistance - it's just THAT simple a design. When the ENEMY is copying your gear... you know it's good.

Mk2Sten.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MP40- Awesome fire rate, in the butterzone, looks good in carbon black, and has a good mag size. PPSH is easy to produce and has a large magazine, yet the fire rate and accuracy are high and low, respectively. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A LOT of fans of 9mm Parabellum here, as well as .45" ACP. I seem to recall that the Sten gun was made in 9mm Parabellum to utilise captured stocks of enemy ammunition... but it wouldn't have been MY choice. (9mm Mauser "Export", used in some Hungarian and Swiss SMGs, which gives much higher muzzle energy, and longer range as well.) The USA developed the M1 carbine (and then the M2, with a "rock and roll" option, and post-war, an M3 variant with a night vision scope, used during the Korean War, and the Man from UNCLE TV series by the baddies.) because pistols and SMGs while they were eminently portable,didn't have much range. For troops who'd find a regular rifle to be over-encumbering llke artillerymen, or drivers, the carbine made sense. It fired a better-than usual pistol-sized cartridge, with better than usual pistol range.Being so lightweight, it was snapped up by combat troops, glad of anything lightweight to carry... but they then complained about the lack of "knock-down power" compared to a full powered rifle.Hence the M2 carbine, fitted with a fire select switch, which (thanks to the round's lowish power) remained controllable (and to an extent made up for the lack of "knock-down", by hitting the target repeatedly,)  I've seen the M2 carbine proposed  as candidate for the first assault rifle... But it seems to me to be merely a glorified SMG. ALL early SMG's were wood stocked, so it's not a disqualification)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×