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Wednesday, July 12, 2017
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Not Bob

Vets & PTSD

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"Many veterans who served in the Vietnam War still have war-zone-related post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a new study published in JAMA Psychiatry".

Every vet I have ever met I swear suffer/suffered from PTSD.

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On 7/17/2017 at 11:03 AM, Not Bob said:

"Many veterans who served in the Vietnam War still have war-zone-related post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a new study published in JAMA Psychiatry".

Every vet I have ever met I swear suffer/suffered from PTSD.

I served with a lot of Vietnam vets while in Alaska in 1975 through 1978, none of which had problems.  Against that, they would also talk about what went on with other vets, which I believed helped a lot.  What did not help was being spat on if you had to wear your uniform while traveling on orders.  I can remember that.  It was not a pleasant experience.

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A lot of us do not show signs of PTSD even though we still have the nightmares and daymares.  We just deal with it and don't talk about the war.  Myself, I have done some interviews for news or history, and I do talk to my brothers in MOPH and VFW, but mostly to help them. 

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It didn't matter what your MOS or job was; if you were in-country, you suffer from some form of PTSD, it just may not show. When I came home from my first tour in 1966 nobody wanted to talk to me about Vietnam. I finally decided to go back. Now, I still have it on my mind. I can only sleep a couple of hours a night and am always getting up to "check the perimeter", and when I do close my eyes, I am right back in-country. People deal with it in different ways. I have learned to live with it.

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u never get rid of the sounds, or sights .  it will stay with you until we die.  i have have problems with the rain, sounds of slicks going over and worst of everything is fireworks.  u have PTSD weather u know it or not think about the time when u were incountry and see what makes u cringe 

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A active duty vet can be yanked back to vietnam night after night for years and not a soul would ever know or guess. Sometimes a few are yanked back because of something that happened that is a bit of a mystery as why it happened. These vets if they every understand why will be able to sleep nights again. "I guess I'm talking about myself now sorry":(

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Yeah, it happened a lot for me after doing Vietnam all of 1968.  Tet Offensive was the worst as it was my first experience of people trying to kill me.  After that I just hardened up.  BUT, it gets better with time, with me anyway.  I found a good wife, had 3 daughters, good job and my daymares and nightmares came less and less.  The triggers are still there, but I can handle them now that I know what they are. 

Thought I was crazy for 20 years until I met and became friends with the (then, 1998) director of the NC state veterans assistance.  He told me I had PTSD and should see someone.  After much nudging, I walked the halls of the Salisbury Va and found a lady Psych at her desk and asked to talk to her.  I received  a lot of help by them just listening, but being in several Veterans organizations is the best help I could have imagined.  Started up a chapter of Military Order of the Purple Heart soon after and felt normal among my fellow warriors.  Try that.

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Posted (edited)

Congratulations!

Thanks for starting the chapter, it helps to be able to talk with folks that understand what you are talking about☺ 

Many years ago I built a website just for guys that were in my old inf unit. One vet said he didn't know if to thank me or cuss me. today he's ok☺

Edited by Lee Helle

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Actually, I found "The Guard Channel" online in 1995 and a flood of memories, bad and good, rolled over me after 23 years of shoving that back into the recesses of my mind.  It opened me up to getting involved with other Veteran organizations which was a good thing.

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I had a few problems that developed when I returned.  I stayed in the Army.  That helped.  A grunt's tour to Panama put me right back into Vietnam's jungle.  The biggest problem today is that people have forgotten that during Vietnam, the label PTSD did not exist.  In fact, it was a hard fought fight to get it seen as a real problem.  Now, it is seen and treated.  I have been on medication since 1990.  I always wonder how many vets did not make it that far.  Then you think about other war vets in other wars.  Yep, we have come a long way.

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What we now call PTSD has probably been around since the beginning of organized warfare. 

In American terms, during the Civil War it was called Soldier's Heart or Nostalgia. World War one it became Shell Shock, World War Two called it Combat Fatigue. For my generation at first it was called Post Vietnam Syndrome and then PTSD.

As it was explained to me during my treatment, PTSD is a normal reaction to abnormal circumstances. 

Once I quit drinking, and I never took the drugs the VA offered, my head gradually cleared with the passage of time. Today I prefer to only associate with fellow veterans, as a member of AmVets, VFW, American Legion, and Vietnam Veterans of America. I do not have any "civilian" friends.

By the way, the new "politically correct" designation is PTS. They no longer want to say we are disordered. As if we are flippin' snowflakes that might suffer damage at a word.

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On 9/3/2018 at 9:43 PM, Big_Al said:

By the way, the new "politically correct" designation is PTS. They no longer want to say we are disordered. As if we are flippin' snowflakes that might suffer damage at a word.

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