Jump to content
Wednesday, July 12, 2017
  • Welcome to the forum!

    Welcome to the War History Online Community Forum, please register or login to start commenting.

Shaheen

What is your all time favourite aircraft?

Recommended Posts

3 minutes ago, Stephen N Russell said:

Was huge in 007 1965 movie Thunderball.

Sadly, the last flying Vulcan retired last year; so no more airshow appearances. It really was a crowdpleaser, able to be thrown around the sky to the delight of spectators.I saw it a few times, and each was a breathtaking as the first. Bombers just aren't supposed to be able to DO that stuff! That's what fighters are about. Given that it was tasked with flying into the USSR at not much more than treetop height, and then delivering an atomic weapon, the first they'd have known about it would have been the mushroom cloud.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw the vulcan at the 2009 airshow in volkel (the netherlands )fantastic airplane.  Why is it grounded ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Johan said:

I saw the vulcan at the 2009 airshow in volkel (the netherlands )fantastic airplane.  Why is it grounded ?

The airframe was worn out and fixing this would be so expensive they decided to ground it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Joris said:

The airframe was worn out and fixing this would be so expensive they decided to ground it. 

Slightly more complicated than that.... The manufacturer declined to provide either some crucial spares or the information required to get them made elsewhere, claiming that the information was "commercially sensitive". FFS, this aircraft not merely is "old enough to be put in a museum", it already LIVES in a bloody museum! After the debacle of getting one of the last Vulcans in squadron service across the Atlantic to bomb Port Stanley, surely lessons had been learned? The V Bombers were so far ahead of their time that when the rest caught up, they'd done so by a different route. Refuelling the Vulcan on the way to Port Stanley was a nightmare, due to incompatible... pretty much everything.

Reminds me of an old friend (now, sadly, departed) who made a good living as a highly skilled draughtsman, specialising in detailing VERY large concrete structures.(Like offshore oil terminals) He saw the rise of computers, and the age of the "Killer App" and ignored them. In his view, Computers were "womens' work" - they had a keyboard, like a typewriter. HIS skill on the other hand was masculine, expressed on a draughting table, using abilities born of long experience. AutoCAD came as something of a shock. Kiddies right out of technical college were suddenly able to do the things that my friend was highly skilled at, without his level of experience (making them a LOT cheaper to hire) He was an analog craftsman in a digital age. I'm astounded that not only the Vulcan, but also Concorde, were both designed effectively without the use of computers. And then FLOWN without the use of computers either. OK, the Lancaster and the B17 were also "designed and flown without the use of computers" - but they flew using MUCH older technology, and at a MUCH slower speed, As that same friend remarked to me: "When Henry Ford first sold the "Model T" there was almost no part of it that you local village blacksmith couldn't (1) understand or (2) replicate or repair at his forge.A modern vehicle, on the other hand, has essential components  which monitor performance hundreds of times per second, and which he'd neither understand nor be able to repair nor replicate without the assistance of a multi-billion dollar factory. Things - the world - changed. And what makes the Vulcan stand out for me is that it ought to be a product of one side of that change, but in fact comes from the other side. When this plane was first built... it ought not to have been possible. Yet it was.

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 20/11/2017 at 1:36 AM, Ron Walker said:

Sadly, the last flying Vulcan retired last year; so no more airshow appearances. It really was a crowdpleaser, able to be thrown around the sky to the delight of spectators.I saw it a few times, and each was a breathtaking as the first. Bombers just aren't supposed to be able to DO that stuff! That's what fighters are about. Given that it was tasked with flying into the USSR at not much more than treetop height, and then delivering an atomic weapon, the first they'd have known about it would have been the mushroom cloud.

I live on the south coast and got to see it a few times in the last years travelling between Shoreham and Bournemouth airshows.

Used to hear it coming then go into the garden and just see this huge space age looking beast!

Nothing beats the Vulcan Howl.

I also saw the original "last" flight as a kid in early nineties I think it was.

A work colleague is a member of the Vulcan club too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 20/11/2017 at 9:18 AM, Joris said:

The airframe was worn out and fixing this would be so expensive they decided to ground it. 

Also down to the guys who have the skills to maintain it had largely already come out of retirement to volunteer to keep it going and quite frankly they're tired too and want their retirement! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a hard time choosing between the F-22 Raptor, PBY Catalina, B-17 Flying Fortress, A-10C Thunderbolt II, P-51D Mustang and A6M Zero.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×