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Wednesday, July 12, 2017
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Joris

Why are you interested in War History?

Question

A simple question but I'm very much interested in your answers!

 

For myself, I've been interested in WWII since I can remember. Then I moved to Arnhem which fueled my interest immensely, so much has happened there and the city still bears the scars. From then on it only got "worse", I moved up the corridor and now live in Veghel, 101st Airborne territory.

In short, I live, breath and eat World War 2 history.

What is your story?

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I’d like to thank you too much for your hot welcome; it is really a civilized and opened mined community. According to war history, it is a “love story”. It started during study; I liked general history very much. Then I preferred war history to general one due to many reasons, as:

1-     It concludes the general history.

2-     It depicts peoples’ suffers and hard times.

3-     It often defines peoples’ destiny after each battle.

4-     It is characterized by hardness, masculinity and heroism.

5-     Finally and simply, if you want to follow the mankind’s footprints, you shall observe their war history

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In response to the question re: military history, I can only say that, as the son of two WWII veterans (both of whom were pilots: MY mother was a WASP, my father flew Mustangs and Thunderbolts and was captured by the Germans, 1 March 1945), I became interested in history as the result of a visit to Manassas battlefield when I was about 6 or 7 and that established my abiding interest in the War Between the States to which I've been hooked ever since. I have been reading voraciously for the last 35 years or so, am now a published book reviewer (including on here recently), primarily on subjects of US military history, and struggle mightily to find the time (as I work two jobs) to get going researching, writing and publishing articles for magazines and other venues. I just wish I wasn't my age and had experience in the field so I could get a job related to the subject (not that I haven't tried). 

Edited by Stuart McClung
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iI am interested in  War history  because i was part of it..  iam nearly 91 years of age,   i wenrt tru tghe London  Blitz, was in the Home Guard when i was 16, i volunteered for the Army on my 17th birthday, called up at 17 and a i/2. and served 4 years in Germeny , Italy and Jugolavia, demobben in jan 1948,  then recalled again in 1951 for retraining for Korea. i wasa D/o in the Royal Artillery.

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Why just WW2 History?! Consider Roman history; there's so much that's relevant to today's world. (Tiberius Graccus, for example, a hero of mine.) How about the Peninsular War against Napoleon's forces. (I was in La Corunna last year, and made a special side trip to see the grave of General Sir John Moore, immortalised in a poem which tells us how he was buried, quietly, in dead of night by his army which practically worshipped the man. Confusingly, the French then dug him up and reburied him in a rather more elaborate grave.)
Sir John Moore is perhaps at the heart of what fascinates me about war.  He was a master of the "Humbug" - where the enemy swoops, knowing exactly where you are... and discovers that they've been totally duped. (Moore lured the French army out onto the far side of a VERY hostile Spain... and then put his men on board Royal naval ships, and sailed away... leaving the French to face millions of angry Spaniards, and disasterous supply problems.(Moore had been hit by a canonball, and had announced  that he wanted to be buried wherever he died.) When there is absolutely NO fodder to be had locally, to feed your cavalry mounts, you need to send your baggage train right the way across Spain - with a substantial cavalry escort, to avoid them being slaughtered by Guerillas - and then bring the fodder all the way back, hoping that the draught horses delivering it and cavalry escort haven't eaten the stuff before they make it back. Churchill wrote in his history of WW1, that "Battles are won by slaughter... or by manoeuvre". I'd add to that "Or sometimes by really clever conjuring tricks". My Grandfathers were a Merchant sailor and a Gloster; my father served (post war) in the RAF in Egypt. I volunteered for the ONLY unit in the army which guarantees that you won't have to sleep in a tent (unless you WANT to) and in which the lowest rank is Lance Corporal. I spoke German (fluently) and passable Russian; Military Intelligence seemed to obvious choice. So, obviously, .the role played BY intelligence services in war is of particular interest.

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My main interest only began in 2007, when I went on a real holiday in Normandy, and yes, we bumped in to some historical places :) That's how it started off. The year after we went back, the year after I went back alone without girlfriend :D But I am now happy I found one who joins me on my trips when she can, on our first date we watched 2 episodes of Band of Brothers.

I study a lot about WWI and WWII. I do some tours for friends now and then as well on WWI as on WWII battlefields. I love learning more about it, researching it and telling about it.

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5 hours ago, Ron Walker said:

Why just WW2 History?

 

Mostly because WWII history is all around me, I have but to walk 100 meters from my house and I'm on a road the 1st Battalion, 501st PIR / 101st AB marched up and down on during Operation Market Garden. They were dug in basically where I live now, that really fueled my interest! 

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9 minutes ago, Linkert said:

My main interest only began in 2007, when I went on a real holiday in Normandy, and yes, we bumped in to some historical places :) That's how it started off. The year after we went back, the year after I went back alone without girlfriend :D But I am now happy I found one who joins me on my trips when she can, on our first date we watched 2 episodes of Band of Brothers.

I study a lot about WWI and WWII. I do some tours for friends now and then as well on WWI as on WWII battlefields. I love learning more about it, researching it and telling about it.

Congratulations on finding your soulmate! It is so much more fun to share it with others, the trick is not to bore them to death with it ;)

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10 hours ago, Joris said:

Mostly because WWII history is all around me, I have but to walk 100 meters from my house and I'm on a road the 1st Battalion, 501st PIR / 101st AB marched up and down on during Operation Market Garden. They were dug in basically where I live now, that really fueled my interest! 

Where I live, right now, is about 100m from the monument to the sailors from the Isle of Man Steam Packet who died saving troops at DunkirkThree ships were lost, but the "fleet" managed to take of 1/14th of those rescued... But about 500 m away is Gansey, a place named by Vikings (who established the Manx parliament, which is the world's oldest democratic forum. Histiry is all aroubd us! I moved here from Weston-Super-Mare, from where my study window gave vepiews out over the town (repeatedly bombed in WW2) Iron aged settlements, the site of the battle of Sedgemoor, and the Island where King Harald's queen took refuge after the Norman invasion. Oh, and the spot where Marconi first demonstrated the use of radio waves to communicate across water. The house stood on a hill from which in the time of Queen Elizabeth 1, Calamine was extracted (then the only known source of calamine in the UK. Calamine was needed to make bells... and cannon.) Surely most places are like the UK? Toss a stone in ANY direction, and where it lands, something interesting once happened?

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14 hours ago, Ron Walker said:

Where I live, right now, is about 100m from the monument to the sailors from the Isle of Man Steam Packet who died saving troops at DunkirkThree ships were lost, but the "fleet" managed to take of 1/14th of those rescued... But about 500 m away is Gansey, a place named by Vikings (who established the Manx parliament, which is the world's oldest democratic forum. Histiry is all aroubd us! I moved here from Weston-Super-Mare, from where my study window gave vepiews out over the town (repeatedly bombed in WW2) Iron aged settlements, the site of the battle of Sedgemoor, and the Island where King Harald's queen took refuge after the Norman invasion. Oh, and the spot where Marconi first demonstrated the use of radio waves to communicate across water. The house stood on a hill from which in the time of Queen Elizabeth 1, Calamine was extracted (then the only known source of calamine in the UK. Calamine was needed to make bells... and cannon.) Surely most places are like the UK? Toss a stone in ANY direction, and where it lands, something interesting once happened?

Absolutely mate, you just have to know where to look! 

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6 hours ago, Joris said:

Absolutely mate, you just have to know where to look! 

Interesting way of putting it... And one with which I'm inclined to disagree. It's about MORE than "looking". My house in Weston was about 2/3 of the way up a hill (Weston's kind of defined by two hills, a couple of miles apart, and both right on the coastline. At the top of the hill part hidden among woodland planted during the Victorian era, you'd find two very similar looking circular holes in the ground. One was an iron age storage pit, about 2,000 years old, the other was created when a Focke-Wulf ditched its bomb load to avoid being shot down, dating it rather more recently at 1943. "Looking" doesn't actually tell you which hole is which! History, for the most part, is INVISIBLE. Likewise, Junction 2 of the M32 motorway out of Bristol... there's NOTHING to indicate that it's (arguably) the exact point  at which the industrial revolution began. ("Wasn't that  Abraham Darby at Ironbridge in Shropshire?" That would be Abraham Darby III, utilising skills that had been developed by his father and grandfather - both (confusingly) also called Abraham THEIR "works" was at Baptist Mills, in Bristol, and they worked in brass. The grandson returned to the family roots in Shropshire, because Bristol has no iron...)

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So long as i can remember i have a intrest in the military . My grandparents had a summerhouse in otterlo nearby a little place called the harskamp were a big training complex of the dutch armed forces was located. So as long i can remember my grandfather and I would go there to watch what I called as a 4 year old pow powers .when i was about 10 years old i discoverd my fathers collection of ww2 books and from that point i want to read and visit everting what has to do whit it. I have been many places with my dad sadly hè died 2 weeks ago and the battle of britian airshow was our last trip together  . So the first trip alone wil be a hard one to do but the south of france and north of Italië will be next

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3 hours ago, Johan said:

So long as i can remember i have a intrest in the military . My grandparents had a summerhouse in otterlo nearby a little place called the harskamp were a big training complex of the dutch armed forces was located. So as long i can remember my grandfather and I would go there to watch what I called as a 4 year old pow powers .when i was about 10 years old i discoverd my fathers collection of ww2 books and from that point i want to read and visit everting what has to do whit it. I have been many places with my dad sadly hè died 2 weeks ago and the battle of britian airshow was our last trip together  . So the first trip alone wil be a hard one to do but the south of france and north of Italië will be next

My family has a strange repeated Dutch connection. During the mass unemployment of tbe "Great Depression", my grandfather went whete the work was - he was a sailor, so he moved his wife and son to Rotterdam, where they had two more sons (my Dad was the middle one, and apparently spoke Dutch better than English until he was seven years old, and the family moved back to England.

My wife's mother had a brother with the same first name as my Dad, he married a young girl from Amsterdam, named Maria. During WW2, the young Maria joined the Dutch resistance; if caught, the Gestapo would have executed the partisan AND their family. This wasn't popular with other family members, who hoped that by ostentatiously throwing their daughter out, they might be spared if she was subsequently captured. When the war ended, she moved to the UK. Her daughter who died unexpectedly a few months back, had a PhD in Dutch language, and translated for a range of customers including the Dutch Roal family.

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I grew up in Morrisville, Pa. Home of Robert Morris, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. It was also located 15minutes from Washington's Crossing and each year, I would go watch the re-enactors cross the ice-choked river and walk the nine, snow-laden miles and fight and defeat the Hessians at Trenton. The Tipping point of the American Revolution. I moved on to visit Gettysburg and then further West to Custer's Battlefield. Now I live in San Francisco, with it rich history of enslaving the Chinese to work the railroads, and minutes away from a Japanese-American Internment camp memorial at Tanforan. I love history and America, is not one without innocent blood on its hands either.

Jim Sullivan-Military Historian In-Training

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On 21.11.2017 г. at 8:57 PM, Joris said:

A simple question but I'm very much interested in your answers!

 

For myself, I've been interested in WWII since I can remember. Then I moved to Arnhem which fueled my interest immensely, so much has happened there and the city still bears the scars. From then on it only got "worse", I moved up the corridor and now live in Veghel, 101st Airborne territory.

In short, I live, breath and eat World War 2 history.

What is your story?

I was graduated in officers military school as tank-automotive officer. First trucks which I drove was Opel Bitz and Steur 640. As a commander of platoon I had russian machines and 5 german PAK 38 and PAK 40.  I had chance to try rusian and german weapons.The other reason is that my grand father take a part in WWI and my father in WWII.  By this reasons I like war history.

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I Am interested in Wars history because it is a major part of history in general. People, civilizations  and countries were greatly changed through wars.

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1 minute ago, Dimitar Minchev said:

I was graduated in officers military school as tank-automotive officer. First trucks which I drove was Opel Bitz and Steur 640. As a commander of platoon I had russian machines and 5 german PAK 38 and PAK 40.  I had chance to try rusian and german weapons.The other reason is that my grand father take a part in WWI and my father in WWII.  By this reasons I like war history.

Well that explains it, it's been spoon fed by the Army! Must have been amazing to work with those WWII weapons, now the only place to find them is in a museum!

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God question. For me it started with that when I was in public school in Sweden we never learn anything speciall of WWII. We never had time in school. Then when I started in high school my school was next to the head library and they had a lot of books on WWII. That was 1983 and when me and my wife moved to Norway 1996 I had read almost all books the library had on WWII including those in Norwegian and English. 

Thats how my war interest started.

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I had experience with russian trucks ZIS 150,151, ZIL 164,157,130,131,German Opel Blitz, Austrian Steur, tank T34, BTR 60,60PB, Chech Praga V3S, German Panzer TIV., machine guns PK, MG 34,42, Assault guns AK 47.Pistols TT, Makarov, Walther.

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Because I was captain in Navy. I always interested in war stories, documentaries, war museums. My grand father had the highest level medal in Turkey's İstiklal war. I read the books of second world war stories. I'm interested in war zone investigator works. 

İSTİKLAL MEDAL.jpg

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Firstly I am x Royal Australian Navy.

My father and his brother, Brother in Law and Cousins fought in WW2. One of my mother's Cousins was a POW in Chengi.

I have relatives who fought in WW1. 

I have a great uncle who fought in the Boer War.

I have Swedish heritage back to the 1500's who were Marine Soldiers.

I love the history  and have doing my family tree since 1984 so. It is all about history to me. Also to make sure their sacrifices are not forgotton.

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My Grandfather was in WW1, the Army.  I had 4 uncles in WW2. 3 in the Army, 1 in the Navy, on a destroyer in the Pacific.  the ones in the Army were Infantry, Transportation( Red Ball Express ), and one was a waist gunner on a B-17.  All were in the European theater.  2 uncles and my father were in the Korean War.  1 uncle in the Navy and the other Uncle was in the Army like my dad.  the one in the navy was on a destroyer, the other uncle was Infantry, and my dad was in the Army's navy(his joke, RIP) as an amphibian driver and gunner.  and we spent time with him in Japan in 1955. I was 4 at the time. 

I was exposed to the military and was always interested in the vehicles involved with my dad's work.  and then later it was the movies that piqued my interest in history as well.  All the war movies and their heroes from all over the world, and I still like a good one.  I served in Vietnam with the 11th armored cavalry, my older brother and cousins were also there with Infantry and Airmobile.  and my son is in Iraq again, 7th. tour with a couple of side trips to Afghanistan as well. 

so in answer to the question, I seem to have been born to it, love the books and some trips made to sites while stationed in Germany.  and as said before, war history does mold a nations history in between wars.

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  I am interested in this because of the many family members who were involved in both world wars plus Korea and Viet Nam, so has a big impact on our history. It makes history so much more interesting, you get a sense of the attitude of the men and women  who served our great country and shouldn't ever be forgotten. All the knowledge gained leads to a profound pride in not only family, but to this country.

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I am amazed at all your answers, thank you so much for sharing your stories! 

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