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Wednesday, July 12, 2017
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Joris

Why are you interested in War History?

Question

A simple question but I'm very much interested in your answers!

 

For myself, I've been interested in WWII since I can remember. Then I moved to Arnhem which fueled my interest immensely, so much has happened there and the city still bears the scars. From then on it only got "worse", I moved up the corridor and now live in Veghel, 101st Airborne territory.

In short, I live, breath and eat World War 2 history.

What is your story?

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5 hours ago, Tim Bowman said:

I used to be a history major in college at one time. I continue to be very interested in history. I have been following your daily emails for several years now.

Plus you all have had my friend Jeremy Amick contributing stories to you as well. He is a very gifted author and historian.

Tim Bowman

He writes amazing stories that we are fortunate enough to share on War History Online! 

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On 02/12/2017 at 8:58 AM, John Cornwell said:

I still have the Purple Heart my Great Grandfather earned. I served in Viet-Nam, and later in Laos. One male of my family has served in the service of this country since 1636. I know a lot, but not enough.

We never do know what we would like to know about war but we will always stand up for what is right.

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I am from Argentina and since I was a kid wapons, battles and wars were an interesting issue for me, WWII, Korean war, Vietnam war are especially interesting.

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As Volunteer Curator of the Military Museum in Branch 63 of the Royal Canadian Legion, Collingwood, Ontario, Canada I can say that you have been a great help in education this former and old sailor of the Royal Canadian Navy. Keep up the good work and I will continue to look good before my Comrades. Thanks and Merry Christmas and a God Blessed 2018.

Don Wilcox

Branch 63 RCL

museum@collingwoodlegion.ca

 

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6 hours ago, Royal Canadian Legion, Col said:

As Volunteer Curator of the Military Museum in Branch 63 of the Royal Canadian Legion, Collingwood, Ontario, Canada I can say that you have been a great help in education this former and old sailor of the Royal Canadian Navy. Keep up the good work and I will continue to look good before my Comrades. Thanks and Merry Christmas and a God Blessed 2018.

Don Wilcox

Branch 63 RCL

museum@collingwoodlegion.ca

 

Don what is your museum like, being an ex sailor myself I love what museums display. I think also being an ex serviceman we appreciate. When I was in Hawaii a few years ago and visited the Arizona Memorial I will never forget tge eerieness I felt. I also loved walking on the decks of the Missouri I could feel the history and being an ex stoker Engine rooms and boiler rooms would have been great to see.

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The museum in Branch 63 is in a room called the North Atlantic Room and is big enough when conveerted to a dinning room can seat some 50 people. All the walls are covered with artifacts and we have seven display cases. We are proud of our museum and the members are very supportive. the Legion is located at 490 Ontario Street, Collingwood, Ontario, Canada and we are right behing the anchor, tank and aircraft located on our parking lot. If you ever get this way Peter Proctor and Jeff Abrahams I will buy the beer.

Don Wilcox

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17 hours ago, Royal Canadian Legion, Col said:

The museum in Branch 63 is in a room called the North Atlantic Room and is big enough when conveerted to a dinning room can seat some 50 people. All the walls are covered with artifacts and we have seven display cases. We are proud of our museum and the members are very supportive. the Legion is located at 490 Ontario Street, Collingwood, Ontario, Canada and we are right behing the anchor, tank and aircraft located on our parking lot. If you ever get this way Peter Proctor and Jeff Abrahams I will buy the beer.

Don Wilcox

I hope to take you up on that one day, my partner loves Canada so hopefully we get there sooner or later. But I must admit it is a fair way to row from Australia

Regards

Jeff

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On 21-11-2017 at 3:57 PM, Joris said:

A simple question but I'm very much interested in your answers!

 

For myself, I've been interested in WWII since I can remember. Then I moved to Arnhem which fueled my interest immensely, so much has happened there and the city still bears the scars. From then on it only got "worse", I moved up the corridor and now live in Veghel, 101st Airborne territory.

In short, I live, breath and eat World War 2 history.

What is your story?

Since I was a kid, I started reading and making drawings about WWII because there were 3 magazines (or comics) about the war areas (U2, SOS and Trinchera, or Trench). I became very fond of them, and collected every one of them through the years. I noticed the gallantry, sacrifice and efforts of the fighting men and the machines they used. I became most interested of WWII planes, being my favorites The Spitfire, the Mosquito, the Tempest, the Lancaster and B-17 bombers from the Allied side, and the ME-109, FW 190, JU 88 and Me-262 from the German side. Also some other fighter bomber planes in particular stories. But later I became also a fan of war films and began to understand the tragedy behind the war. I think that no war was so special than this: there were the biggest  battles known everywhere (exceptin Jutland),  as the Battle of Britain, Stalingrad, Kursk, D-Day, the biggest deploy of submarines, the biggest and more powerful war ships known, the larger bomber attacks, the technical advances and, of course, the atomic bombs. Never so many million dead people and so much destruction were achieved. From then on nothing was the same when talking about wars.

 

Edited by Carlos Ruz
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For me it began as a child I guess because of family connections and what they were interested in.

I've mentioned elsewhere but numerous family members were in the armed forces in the first and second world wars.

I've always been interested to hear their experiences of the war.

It also helps living on the south coast of England where there are numerous reminders about such as old RAF bases, pillboxes, and of course Portsmouth - the home of the Royal Navy with its numerous museums and warships dotted about the place.

My grandfather used to take me to museums and I loved them.

I started reading, making models, talking and visiting stuff from there.

This led to a history degree and I'm still interested 10 years later!

Sometimes on an academic level really focusing on topics and sometimes just because I like seeing and talking about history!

 

Edited by Edward, The Black Prince
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On 09/12/2017 at 2:28 PM, Peter Proctor said:

iI am interested in  War history  because i was part of it..  iam nearly 91 years of age,   i wenrt tru tghe London  Blitz, was in the Home Guard when i was 16, i volunteered for the Army on my 17th birthday, called up at 17 and a i/2. and served 4 years in Germeny , Italy and Jugolavia, demobben in jan 1948,  then recalled again in 1951 for retraining for Korea. i wasa D/o in the Royal Artillery.

Great to hear your story Peter and thank you for your service!

Nice to hear from someone who actually experienced the history instead of just reading about it.

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21 hours ago, Carlos Ruz said:

Since I was a kid, I started reading and making drawings about WWII because there were 3 magazines (or comics) about the war areas (U2, SOS and Trinchera, or Trench). I became very fond of them, and collected every one of them through the years. I noticed the gallantry, sacrifice and efforts of the fighting men and the machines they used. I became most interested of WWII planes, being my favorites The Spitfire, the Mosquito, the Tempest, the Lancaster and B-17 bombers from the Allied side, and the ME-109, FW 190, JU 88 and Me-262 from the German side. Also some other fighter bomber planes in particular stories. But later I became also a fan of war films and began to understand the tragedy behind the war. I think that no war was so special than this: there were the biggest  battles known everywhere (exceptin Jutland),  as the Battle of Britain, Stalingrad, Kursk, D-Day, the biggest deploy of submarines, the biggest and more powerful war ships known, the larger bomber attacks, the technical advances and, of course, the atomic bombs. Never so many million dead people and so much destruction were achieved. From then on nothing was the same when talking about wars.

 

I must add that I had no relationship with the military, I was related to graphic and tales of war, but my beloved grandfather, the most influential person in my life, was a policeman. He had great admiration for the German people and their armed forces, sometimes he spoke about this. When I started learning about the other side, the atrocities against the untermensch, you can imagine my shock. Later I went to the Chilean Navy Academy to become Merchant Marine Engineer and there learned about the respect and admiration to the German martiality and saw the same throughout South America. You´ve known about nazi people that were protected by Argentina, Brasil, Paraguay, Bolivia, Peru and Chile, no doubt the money paid to them had something to do, but a lot of loyalty had to do with respect and admiration and I could see this a lot of times. It is said that war brings out the best and the worst of men, in the end I stay with the feeling that noble and ordinary fighting men are abused and exploited by their superiors and politicians for purposes that sometimes are not the best.

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