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Wednesday, July 12, 2017
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    • By Brian Espinoza Cuevas
      Mr. Andrew Knighton, the He 219 was anything, but slow. With a powerplant of two Daimler-Benz DB 603E liquid-cooled inverted V12 engines, developing 1,800 PS (1,324 kW) each, they gave the "Owl" a top speed of 385 mph (616 Km/h). So actually was one of the fastest nightfighters of WWII. Best regards. Brian. 
    • By Piao Lin
      65th inf.regiment  the Borinqueer regiment whose were the last infantry UNIT whose participated in the last bayonet fight during the Korean war as register so far in the war  books history.
    • By dwayma
      Hello all! My name is Devon and I am a Digital Media and Animation BS senior at SUNY Alfred State. Ever since my senior year of high school, I had an idea for an application that would allow users to explore the history of WWII. This would include features such as viewing vehicles, weapons, clothing, listening to music, and watching simulated battles from the era. At first the project started as a mobile phone application that would use the user's phone camera to display the items in an augmented space. During my junior year at Alfred I learned we would be getting virtual reality headsets and thought to myself, "What better way to view something in incredible detail than in virtual reality?!" Soon after I found myself deleting unneeded files from the mobile application and sparing the ones I could recycle for the VR version
      Two years later and I finally have a release version with enough features to introduce the application to the public. These features include a theater room in which the user can watch movies projected on a screen that have to do with various battles, documentaries, and plenty more to come. Users can also listen to music of the WWII era from various countries on a 1:1 scale record player; much like how people listened to music in that time period. The final feature included (again, with plenty more to come) is the ability to view various vehicles in 1:1 scale. Watch a Spitfire aircraft soar through the sky from an observer tower over 40ft in the air! Witness the massive size of various tanks! All of this can be done from within one application from the comfort of your own home
      The application does require a virtual reality system such HTC Vive, Oculous or Windows Mixed Reality. The application is free so if you know someone who has access to such technology, you can download the application on your machine and run it using their system. The application is free and will continue to be so but donations to support the project and developers work are accepted. Feel free to leave a comment, question or suggestion for the application on this thread or the project page. If you do not feel comfortable posting your question feel free to direct message me and I will get  back to you as soon as possible.
      Project page: https://splitboxstudios.itch.io/wwii-vr
    • By Dan Ross
      A couple of weeks ago I spent the weekend exploring the Meuse-Argonne Forest and Verdun.
      Day 1:
      I started my Argonne exploration seeing the battle of Vauqois. This small village on top of a a massive hill that overlooked all of the Verdun and beyond became a massive struggle for occupation between the Germans and French. For months they would continuously charge at the bayonet to claim just feet of ground. Eventually, it came to it that the only way to take the area was underground. Beneath the hills both Germans and French dug tunnels to set explosives to blow each other off the ground. Today, you are able to walk this battlefield and even get tours into the German Tunnels; the French tunnels being closed to the public due to collapses.
       
      Photo gathered from http://www.webmatters.net/
      My next stop would be to the Kaiser Bunkers. Here (if you have played Battlefield 1) is where the Kaisers son would take up post to over watch the battle of Verdun. In 1918, the AEF would fight a bloody battle to take these bunkers and push towards the town of Varness-Argonne.

      Photo taken by myself.
       
      Next, I would travel to the site of the Lost Battalion. Let me tell you, Hollywood does no justice to where they actually fought. The site of where the Battalion fended off the defending Germans is a steep, narrow side of the mountain where you would think it impossible to dig small trenches and holes to hide from incoming enemy (and friendly) artillery. God bless those men.

      Photo taken by myself.
       
      I visited the site of the Battle of Montfaucon. Here would be another struggle for a small village overlooking the Argonne forest. The battle obliterated the village which stood for centuries before. What's left of the site is a ruined church where, in the picture below, you can see a pill box that was constructed by the Germans out of the church ruble to fend of the Americans.

      Photo taken by myself.
      Lastly, I visited the largest U.S. Cemetery in Europe: The Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery. Containing 14,276 Marines, Soldiers, and Sailors who lost their lives in the 1918 fighting.


      Photos taken by myself.
       
       
      Day 2:
      The next day I did an extensive exploration of the Battle of Verdun.
      Starting out with Fort Vaux you enter on a self guided tour through these dark, gloomy and damp halls where the men fought a bloody and gruesome fight. With gas and flamethrowers pouring into the halls to kill the men inside.
      There is so much to see on these hills overlooking Verdun, I feel you need more than a day to explore it all. We all know the Forts of Douaumont and Vaux but there is so many more around the area to visit and explore. If you have the guts to do it, and a flashlight, you can walk into the woods and find different forts with entrances wide open still and explore. I Do reccomend watching for those 20 meter drops though. The staff will recommend you to not enter these dwellings but it is free of will to do so.
      I also highly recommend to study the trench lines and fighting beneath the forts for you treasure hunters. Walking down the south-eastern side of Fort Douaumont you will find a lot of shell casings, mortar rounds, and plenty of other things. BE ADVISED: There are still some contaminated spots and hundreds of thousands of pounds of unexploded ordinance. If you do not know what it is DO NOT TOUCH IT. That's my best recommendation!
      Anyways folks, I hope I did not bore you too much with my rambling on and hope you found the photos fascinating! Below are more that i took of both the Meuse-Argonne and Verdun.
      The Lost Battalion Memorial

       
      German Cemetary

      Vauquois Memorial


      Verdun: Then and now.

      Verdun Cemetery




    • By Stephen N Russell
      Love to see a documentary mini about when 3 SR71s over flew Hanoi & made sonic boom in 1972 while war  raged & boosted POW morale.
      Awesome morale story via the SR 71.
      Has anyone served in any SR 71 Sqdn, Group during the Cold War & Vietnam?
      Did anyone here about Hanoi sonic boom buzz in 1972.
      Any way we can contact ex Nam POWs about sonic boom buzz??
      Make an awesome story to tell.
      Anything A-Z on SR 71 from those who Served in said Squadrons, Wing, Group aside Skunk Works ex employees IF declassfied.
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       


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