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Wednesday, July 12, 2017
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Joris

Which battle was the turning point in World War II in Europe??

Tell us what you think!  

189 members have voted

  1. 1. At which battle did the tide of war change against Nazi Germany?

    • Battle of Britian
      46
    • Battle of Stalingrad
      99
    • Battle of Kursk
      17
    • Normandy Invasion
      26
    • Operation Torch
      1
    • I do not vote in polls
      1


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25 minutes ago, Ron Walker said:

Throughout the war, Germany was continually wrong-footed because it believed the skilfully created lies fed to its own "intelligence network" by Britain's "Twenty Committee". And - unlike Germany - The Brits WERE able to check if their tricks WERE working - because they were "reading Hitler's mail".

The Soviets ran similar networks, such as 'Max and Morris' in the west and Sorge's in the east. 

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10 hours ago, George Collins said:

The Soviets ran similar networks, such as 'Max and Morris' in the west and Sorge's in the east. 

Clearly, you're not a WIlhelm Busch fan (there's a rather good small museum devoted to his work in Hannover). That would be "Max und Moritz", initially a 19th century series of seven illustrated poems about two badly behaved lads. As a name purloined for an intelligence network, it was initially an Austrian based operation, that later got absorbed by Germany. But "SImilar" to the XX Committee? Not really on the same scale. Despite an endless stream of fictional works, Information between the UK and Germany was pretty much 100% controlled by British Intelligence.If Germany knew something (or rather, THOUGHT that they knew something) then it was because it was being spoon fed to them. They HAD no agents in the UK - they just thought that they had!

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Ron Walker said:

Clearly, you're not a WIlhelm Busch fan (there's a rather good small museum devoted to his work in Hannover). That would be "Max und Moritz", initially a 19th century series of seven illustrated poems about two badly behaved lads. As a name purloined for an intelligence network, it was initially an Austrian based operation, that later got absorbed by Germany. 

I'm not aware of the 19th century poems, but I am aware of Ricard Kauder - yes, an Austrian Jew, - who was formally on Canaris's staff, while run by the notorious NKVD operative Sudoplatov. He was actually stationed in Sofia, Bulgaria for most for the war. I don't think that anybody can make a definitive call on what spy network was the most effective. What's remarkable about Kauder is that he would be also instrumental in supplying Ben Gurion with the Czech made weaponry in 1948.

Edited by George Collins

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