Jump to content
Wednesday, July 12, 2017
Joris

Introductions

Recommended Posts

Hello Johan, always nice to welcome another fellow Dutchman to the forum!

It would be great if you could share some of your travels with us here, I would love to see your pictures and I'm sure others will like them too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Carl, welcome to the forum!

You sure have been busy at the archives, it would be great it if you could share some of your findings with us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ik ben tijdelijk in het buitenland aan het werk maar zodra ik terug ben zal ik het archief in duiken

Met vriendelijke groet 

Johan

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This year thè tank museum in bovington was the biggest suprise i knew thy had many but what i saw there was so much that I have to go back because my brain was full with all the special and one of tanks  .20170624_094256.thumb.jpg.64b6b444344d7a9c7a53e7f6a964fbd8.jpg20170624_094350.thumb.jpg.c44c9a6a8f337b52e07dc1c9a7213d86.jpg

20170624_133915.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The tank museum truly is awesome, thanks for posting those pics!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New member checking in with a little info. I am a US Navy veteran from the Vietnam era having enlisted Dec. of 1965. Boot camp at San Diego, AMH "A" school at Millington, Tennessee, Vt25 Beeville, Texas, RVAW-110 at NAS North Island, VAW-113 Black Eagles aboard the USS Constellation CVA-64. Did a number of jobs during my working career such as house to house milk sales, production welder in a rail car plant, dealership auto parts sales, 30 years and 5 million miles interstate transportation. Presently live in Denton, Texas since 1974 and enjoy history, photography, mustangs, tinkering with mechanical stuff, hunting & shooting, fishing, and wee bit of collecting firearms. I might not post too often but I enjoy reading many of the threads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello

My name is Noel, I live in France, near Clermont-Ferrand

I'm 49

I'm an ex-french army E6

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been reading the daily WHO email for quite awhile.  Finally joined the Forum.

Born in Manheim, PA while my dad was stationed at Roye-Ami Airfield in France in March 1945.  My Dad was a B-26 pilot.  Moved to California when I was 16 and graduated from Cal-State Long Beach in 1967.  Went to Air Force OTS at Lackland AFB, San Antonio, TX in November 1967.  Commissioned a brand new 2nd Lieutenant (Wearing my Dad's Gold Bars) on February 16, 1968.  Was stationed for 4 years at Otis AFB, MA where I served as a Missile Launch Officer for the 26th ADMS (BOMARC).  Left the Air Force as a Captain in February of 1972 and moved back to California.  Spent 2 years there and was transferred by my company to the DFW area in Texas.  Been here ever since.

My Grandfather was Army in France in WWII, my dad, as I mentioned, was US Army Air Corp, I was USAF and my son was USMC.

Since my dad passed away in 2008, I have been on a quest to build a complete picture of his time in the service.  I have joined the B-26 Marauder Historical Society and have attended their Reunions.  It is so great to be able to talk to the 1st Generation guys who actually flew the B-26.  This past spring we met in Washington, DC and saw "FlakBait" up close and personal.  What an awesome trip.

My best friend is a Korean War vet and I signed him up for the DFW Honor Flight.  I wanted to be his guardian, but since I am 72, they wouldn't let me!  Too Old!  Several weeks later, I received a call from Honor Flight telling me that David and I are both going on the Honor Flight to Washington DC on the first weekend of November.  His son and my son will be our guardians.  It will be an honor to be with David and our sons on this trip!

I am interested in anything WWII Army Air Corp and especially the B-26.

Look forward to spending some time on this board.

MarauderJoe

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Joe, what a great introduction!

Welcome to the forum, I'm sure you will like it here!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am in Canada. Interested in Canadian military history, but also in Australian since  relatives have served in Boer War , WW1, WW2 and Vietnam.

Toured WW1 sites . A journey with much emotion, especially when kneeling at the grave of an uncle KIA near Ypres. Two uncles went through Gallipoli and northern France/Belgium. Others just in France and one in Middle East.

In WW2 two uncles served in North Africa and New Guinea.

Especially interested in WW1. Also weapons, esp.sidearms.

Sure wish I had talked to those survivors!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What an incredible family history, I'm humbled. Welcome to the forum, I'm sure you will feel at home here. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello everyone...my name is Dave and I live in Southern Onatrio, Canada. I am a retired police officer and my son is currently serving in the Canadian Army as a medic. I have a true love for our veterans and those currently serving. I also have a tiny FB page where I try to post a daily piece of military history (Usually Canadian)...Its pretty new but you are more than free to take a peak or post in it. My goal is to educate the people on our military history as well as what are currently serving (reg force or reserve) Nothing is sold and no advertising, just education 👍🇨🇦. https://m.facebook.com/groups/116705938993370?view=permalink&id=130567877607176

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My little intro includes that I am a retired policeman who's had a lifelong interest in history, especially the small quirky stories in the big stories.  I've BA in Political Science from the University of Oklahoma and a better than average knowledge of firearms.  I read a lot of American Civil War History, Fur Trade/Trapper history, and American western history.  Have also read some English and Scottish history.  The pic is very old, and I'm getting there myself!

Edited by Pat Malone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

I am Therese. I'm 50 and Australian. My parents had me very late in life. My father was a WW2 Veteran and my mother lived through it as well. My mothers brother was in 460 Squadron and killed over Germany on May 7th 1942. He was on his 5th bomber mission, his first as Captain of his Wellington bomber. He is buried at Durnbach War Cemetry outside Munich. Most of my family have been to visit there to pay our respects.

My father survived. He served in 215 squadron as a Bombadier / Navigator. He joined up to the day, 1 year after Uncle Reg (above) joined up. Most certainly what saved his life. He trained in Canada and then crossed the Atlantic during the awful days of the German U-boats...a miracle there! He wasn't in the UK long and was deployed into 215 Squadron and they flew via the Middle East to India / Bangladesh. He was based in what is now Bangladesh.

He served with distinction. Earning a DFC from 2 commendations. One for bombing a Japanese supply ship that the allies had been searching for. Apparently they knew this ship was going to supply Japanese troops and had tracked it for a while, then lost it.  Dad was known for NEVER dropping a bomb if he couldn't hit the target. He did not want to kill anyone that he didn't have to. His Captain luckily and crew thought the same, so this day they were on their way "home" carrying ONE bomb. This was a big deal as carrying bombs made the aircraft heavier and it therefore not only used more fuel, but was a bigger target to Zeros as they couldn't fly as fast or maneuver as well. Anyway, dad was looking through his scope and the clouds parted for just a few seconds and he saw the supply ship below! He only got a look at it for a few seconds, but knew the markings and KNEW it was the ship everyone had been looking for. He told his captain, who had to trust him implicitly. They discussed it briefly and the entire crew said "if Fred says it's the X, then we believe him" and they had the ONE bomb. The Captain said "we will only get ONE chance. If we don't hit the target? They will be able to hit us and we'll go down"....They all agreed to take the chance...the pressue must have been immense. Dad would have been 20 years of age at the time! Hard to imagine. Anyway, they broke cover, dived for the ship, it WAS the supply ship and apparently dad managed to drop the bomb perfectly down one of it's middle funnels and blew it to smithereans!!! According to some, this one hit, stopping the supply to the Japanese, had a HUGE effect on the Japanese and certainly helped change things to our side.

He was also commended for his good humour, ability to keep morale high and his good nature and leadership in times of high action. 

He was a great man. He didn't die until a few years ago. He never told us these stories. Mum didn't know until the 1990's and none of us did, what his DFC was for. We eventually found out the story via his crewmates. Most all lived well into their 80s which was wonderful. They were from UK, Australia and NZ. A mixed bag. 215 started as a RAF squadron but became a RAAF squadron, Hence the mixed bag of nationalities.

I've always been very interested in WW2 history. 

Mum lived through it here in Australia. She lived in Brisbane and she drove cars for the Americans:-) She was engaged to an American serviceman who was KIA sadly. She didn't meet dad until 1952.

I am the youngest of 6 kids. I think I'm by far the most interested in dads war history and war history in general.

I have collected tons of memorabilia from dads mates and I intend, one day, to do something with it. I got the idea in my late 30s and wrote to all dads crewmates. Most were still alive and in decent  health and most sent me everything they had and wrote of their recollections of events and their service. It's wonderful material indeed. I have it safely stored and have started on restoration of pictures and typing out the stories etc. It's a massive job and one day, I'll have time to really do something with it all.

Cheers,

Therese

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×