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Wednesday, July 12, 2017
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Ilkka Kivi

Finns Saved Helsinki from the Bombings of 1944

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There is a serious inaccuracy at the beginning of the article https://www.warhistoryonline.com/instant-articles/helsinki-bombings-1944.html?full-theme=1

...claiming that Finland was invaded by the USSR during the Winter War. While they did invade some land areas in the eastern Finland, in fact Finland was never invaded by USSR and Helsinki remained together with London and Moscow the only European capital of a country having participated the War that WAS NOT invaded during the war.

 

Finland, along with Poland, was entangled in WWII from the very beginning. In November 1939, the USSR invaded the Scandinavian country and, in 1940, despite significant resistance by the Finns, the Moscow Peace Treaty was signed.”

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Posted (edited)
24 minutes ago, Ilkka Kivi said:

Finland was never invaded by USSR and Helsinki remained together with London and Moscow the only European capital of a country having participated the War that WAS NOT invaded during the war.

"To invade" does not mean to completely take over or occupy. As soon as a hostile force crosses the border, it basically invades the target country. So, RKKA did invade Finland on November 30, 1939.

Edited by George Collins
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The Winter War (as it is called) was a costly mistake made by Stalin. The much smaller Finnish military held it's own and exacted a heavy toll on the Russian Army. In the end Finland signed an armistice that gave Russia 11% of Finland territory but they were not conquered. The USSR lost thousands of troops and hundreds of tanks which could have helped repel the German invasion which was coming soon.

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13 hours ago, Triumphdave said:

The Winter War (as it is called) was a costly mistake made by Stalin. The much smaller Finnish military held it's own and exacted a heavy toll on the Russian Army. In the end Finland signed an armistice that gave Russia 11% of Finland territory but they were not conquered. The USSR lost thousands of troops and hundreds of tanks which could have helped repel the German invasion which was coming soon.

It also gave a false idea of the USSR's resiliance.

There's no doubt that Mannerheim's troops brilliantly held the Red Army as long as there was snow on the ground. But given the arrival of spring and Timoshenko resistance couldn't continue. ( A historical reversal, previously "General Winter"always fought for the Russians !)

Hitler and his planners drew the wrong conclusions.

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17 hours ago, Triumphdave said:

The Winter War (as it is called) was a costly mistake made by Stalin. The much smaller Finnish military held it's own and exacted a heavy toll on the Russian Army. In the end Finland signed an armistice that gave Russia 11% of Finland territory but they were not conquered. The USSR lost thousands of troops and hundreds of tanks which could have helped repel the German invasion which was coming soon.

Sure thing - just the magnitude of the losses were in the ball park of 150,000 dead and 200,000 wounded for the Sovjets and tanks were also rather in thousands than hundreds...

 

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9 hours ago, Philip Whitehouse said:

There's no doubt that Mannerheim's troops brilliantly held the Red Army as long as there was snow on the ground. But given the arrival of spring and Timoshenko resistance couldn't continue. ( A historical reversal, previously "General Winter"always fought for the Russians !)

I'm not sure that quagmire in Karelia is any better than snow for moving troops and equipment. But attrition was a big problem for the Finns for sure. It's doubtful that they could hold off RKKA for another month or so.

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The much smaller Finnish military held it's own and exacted a heavy toll on the Russian Army. In the end Finland signed an armistice that gave Russia 11% of Finland territory but they were not conquered. 

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