Jump to content
Wednesday, July 12, 2017
  • Welcome to the forum!

    Welcome to the War History Online Community Forum, please register or login to start commenting.

Maryann Harty

Please stop using the term "awarded"

Recommended Posts

PLEASE  have your writers STOP using the term "awarded or win" when referring to someone who has RECEIVED the Medal of Honor.

Those people didn't go out planning to "WIN" the MoH...It's a small request but it is the correct way to refer to this great honor.

Regards,

Maryann

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree that "win"is quite inappropriate. Actively seeking a decoration is seldom an aim of the receipient.

On the other hand " Awarded" seems fine. It is a acknowledgement by authority of heroism rather than a goal of the hero.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a writer, I think it's a very valid point.  However, I'm not sure how I feel about the term "awarded".  If we take into consideration the modern use of the word and it's actual definition, it can easily be taken to mean the actual process of presenting something that is due.  In that respect, I don't think it has the quite the same connotation as "win".  Having said that, it can be understood to mean the presentation of a "prize" which the original poster is objecting to.  I definitely understand and agree with ceasing to use the term "win" when speaking of the Medal of Honor but I think "awarded" might be debatable.  Anyone else have any thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Jon M Brown said:

As a writer, I think it's a very valid point.  However, I'm not sure how I feel about the term "awarded".  If we take into consideration the modern use of the word and it's actual definition, it can easily be taken to mean the actual process of presenting something that is due.  In that respect, I don't think it has the quite the same connotation as "win".  Having said that, it can be understood to mean the presentation of a "prize" which the original poster is objecting to.  I definitely understand and agree with ceasing to use the term "win" when speaking of the Medal of Honor but I think "awarded" might be debatable.  Anyone else have any thoughts?

 

The term "received" is merely the result of an "award". Thus, if there was no "award" there would be no reception.

But if  "award" is not acceptable, then what ?   "Invested" ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The correct term, in US service, is "decorated" as in a full dress awards parade when the command is given by the adjutant:  "Colors and personnel to be decorated . . . Center . . . March!" At which point the band plays an appropriate number, the colors come forward from the center of the formation, and the personnel to be decorated come traipsing out from wherever they had been stashed and form a line, senior decoration to the right as they face the reviewing stand and between the colors and the reviewing party. 'Struth for certes the word "decorate" is rarely used by anyone to describe pinning or hanging a medal on someone.

That being said, "received" is okay and, yes, even "awarded," in the non specific vernacular, but never, ever, any form of "win" or "won" . . . performing an act for which one is decorated is/was not a competition.

And a posthumous award, usually given to the next of kin . . . the decoration, whatever it might be, is presented to such, though the reality is for Medals of Honor, Navy Crosses, Distinguished Service Crosses, and Air Force Crosses, the top tier medals for valor in US service, presentations are usually fairly public affairs.  Below that, such presentations tend to be less ostentatious and are generally fairly private affairs usually conducted in an office somewhere.  By the end of the WW2, posthumous decorations were simply mailed to the next of kin with a nice letter from somebody important and the citation.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally I think the word "award or awarded" is fine. It has little to do in suggesting that the recipient was actively and purposefully seeking such an award. It is also not likely. To qualify for any medal of honour requires the kind of bravery that few would actively and purposefully seek. Very unlikely.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, 753mike said:

I believe that the term "earned the V.C." would be unarguable . 

I suppose it depends how you view the term "earned".

"Earned" could be seen as a goal, a result of conduct

But being awarded a VC is not the prime objective, not what is sought by the receipient but rather,perhaps,a by-product of action.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well , I disagree . I did not earn 8 "O" levels and 4 "A" levels , but I did earn praise for so doing .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/5/2018 at 10:13 AM, 753mike said:

Well , I disagree . I did not earn 8 "O" levels and 4 "A" levels , but I did earn praise for so doing .

You are quite entitled to disagree. It's really a matter of semantics.

(BTW  What's the significance of the GCE results ?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The GCE thingy was just used as an example of what can't be earned . I could have mentioned my degree , the same would apply .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/6/2018 at 10:36 AM, 753mike said:

The GCE thingy was just used as an example of what can't be earned . I could have mentioned my degree , the same would apply .

Now you have lost me. Surely success in the GCE-or any other series of examinations- can be earned by hard graft. It's the object of the exercise.  On the other hand, being awarded  a military decoration is a by-product of conduct ,not a goal in itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK , I have a driving license , did I earn it ? No , I passed a test . I will not argue the semantics applicable to military medals as I have some , so will stay neutral . 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heck of a coincidence , this just came into my mailbox .

3 of 174
 cleardot.gif
 cleardot.gif
 
 
 
 
 
 
Print all
In new window

Soldier's Medal for NCO who saved a life

Inbox
x
 
 
 
profile_mask2.png

Army Times Unsubscribe

23:02 (28 minutes ago)
cleardot.gif
 
cleardot.gif
cleardot.gif
to me
cleardot.gif
 
 
 
 
 
 
725f6131.gif
Having trouble viewing this email? | View it in your browser
Army Times
Daily News Roundup
Today's news you shouldn't miss
 
Instagram Icon Facebook Icon Twitter Icon
 
GPO3CZGDLJH7LL436TTPWR2VPQ.jpg
Fort Knox soldier earns Soldier’s Medal for saving man from burning fuel truck
The sergeant first class received the Soldier's Medal on Friday at Fort Knox, Kentucky.
Advertisement

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, 753mike said:

OK , I have a driving license , did I earn it ? No , I passed a test . I will not argue the semantics applicable to military medals as I have some , so will stay neutral . 

Did you earn your Driving Licence?  Of course you did. You took lessons and studied (presumably) to achieve your aim of passing the test and being able to drive legally. It just didn't happen . You earned it. Congratulations ! 

BTW I too,was awarded Military Medals. I didn't seek them so I didn't "earn" them. On the other hand, I too, possess academic qualifications and you can bet I worked to get them, so I consider I earned them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is obviously no point in continuing this discussion .

I shall leave you to find another subject  on which to pontificate .

Look at my original comment where I said "I believe that the term earned....." . I believe . Full stop . Argue all you like . I still believe .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, 753mike said:

There is obviously no point in continuing this discussion .

I shall leave you to find another subject  on which to pontificate .

Look at my original comment where I said "I believe that the term earned....." . I believe . Full stop . Argue all you like . I still believe .

Believe what you like:- it's your perogative.

As for accusing me of "pontificating", I'm only giving my opinion- and isn't that what a forum such as this is all about ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To quote yourself , it's all down to semantics , and I might add also , spelling , unless you actually meant "perogative" .

I note that you remain silent about the word "earned" in the caption of the picture wot i scent , shurely you can come up wiv sumfink .

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps just another fine example of poor writing by selecting the wrong word from someone who portrays him/herself as a "journalist".

Edited by R Leonard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, R Leonard said:

Perhaps just another fine example of poor writing by selecting the wrong word from someone who portrays him/herself as a "journalist".

Who's the "journalist" in this exchange ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, 753mike said:

To quote yourself , it's all down to semantics , and I might add also , spelling , unless you actually meant "perogative" .

I note that you remain silent about the word "earned" in the caption of the picture wot i scent , shurely you can come up wiv sumfink .

Yep. (sorry- affirmative) I once had an English Teacher who  reported that my spelling was "atrocious" (Now that's something I really "earned") But if you're going to insist on the rather stilted "prerogative",that's cool with me. I do have this habit of lapsing into the vernacular.

Edited by Philip Whitehouse

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Philip Whitehouse said:

Who's the "journalist" in this exchange ?

I thought it referred to the bloke who wrote the caption for the photo of the "awardee" of a medal .

I could of course be wrong , like many of us can be through misunderstanding . 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whoa there big fella. Easy now.  It is always best not to take offense unless and until it is well, truly, and pointedly offered.

I was referring to the lug nut who wrote the headline for the article in "Army Times," above.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×