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Wednesday, July 12, 2017
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Must see museumship:

Every veteran who served is recognized & named over the PA with a Thank You for Your service.

No audio wands on tour.

Follow yellow arrows.

Much work to be done.

No food service.

Can take pieces  of deck home for 5.00

On tour Did NOT see CIC,Mn Engine spaces or Main battle turret for16 in guns.

Much more to be done.

Arriving on deck, the deck watch asks if any is military or former,U give him your details  & hear name announced  over PA.

No food service ashore.

Signage helps explain tour

Love the  5 in turrets, compact size.

Much labor  in a BB alone for all manned guns.

16 in guns alone had huge workforce.

See Iowa, San Pedro CA, near Cruise Terminal Center.

Take 110 Frwy to San Pedro.

 

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